Gender Pay Gap : "Still a Long Way to Closing it"

1 April 2010

Marlyn Glen has said that progress on reducing the gender pay gap in Scotland is being maintained but that there is still "a long distance to go in closing it."

She was responding to answers to her Parliamentary Questions on the gender pay gap over the past two years in Scotland from Finance Secretary John Swinney

Ms. Glen said,

"The chief reasons for the gender pay gap are the concentration of women in low-paid work, the undervaluing of that work, and the penalty for women’s caring duties and raising a family.

" While some progress has been achieved in full time employment rates, the fact remains that women working part-time earn around 35 per cent less per hour than men who work full-time."

The media hourly pay rate for women in Scotland in full time employment expressed as percentage of the rate for men rose from 88 per cent in 2007 to 92 per cent last year.

In the public sector , the female rate remained in the 95-96 per cent range of the rate for men over the same two year period.

In the private sector, the female rate remained at just below 80 per cent of the rate for men in the same period.

Another method of expressing the gender pay gap is to compare the median hourly rate of pay for men in full time employment with the corresponding rate for women in part-time employment.

This is because so many more women work part-time than men.

In Scotland last year 40 per cent of women worked part time compared with just 10 per cent of men.

The gender pay gap between the hourly rate of pay for men in full-time employment and women in part-time employment is 35 per cent in Scotland.





Sources of information :

Parliamentary Questions

Income

Marlyn Glen

To ask the Scottish Executive what the median hourly rates of pay were for (a) men in full-time employment, (b) women in full-time employment and (c) women in part-time employment in the private sector in each of the last three years for which information is available.

Answered by John Swinney:

The preferred source for earnings estimates is the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), which is carried out by the Office for National Statistics.

The following table shows the median gross hourly pay excluding overtime for full-time and part-time employee jobs in the private sector in Scotland by gender in 2007, 2008 and 2009. The median is the recommended measure of average earnings as opposed to the mean.

Median gross hourly pay excluding overtime for full-time and part-time employee jobs in the private sector in Scotland by gender (£):


2007

2008

2009

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Full time

10.81

8.56

11.21

8.95

11.44

9.00

Part time

6.11

6.11

6.29

6.33

6.50

6.48

Source: Annual Survey for Hours and Earnings.

 

Calculation : Private sector Female pay expressed as percentage of male

Full time 2007 79 %    2008 79%    2009 79%

 

Marlyn Glen

To ask the Scottish Executive what the median hourly rates of pay were for (a) men in full-time employment, (b) women in full-time employment and (c) women in part-time employment in the public sector in each of the last three years for which information is available.

Answered by John Swinney : 

The preferred source for earnings estimates is the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), which is carried out by the Office for National Statistics.

The following table shows the median gross hourly pay excluding overtime for full-time and part-time employee jobs in the public sector in Scotland by gender in 2007, 2008 and 2009. The median is the recommended measure of average earnings as opposed to the mean.

Table " Median gross hourly pay excluding overtime for full-time and part-time employee jobs in the public sector in Scotland by gender (£):


2007

2008

2009

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Full-time

13.08

12.53

13.77

13.06

14.54

13.76

Part-time

11.17

8.26

9.49

9.22

10.67

9.80

Source: Annual Survey for Hours and Earnings.

Notes:

1. The estimates are based on the pay excluding overtime for employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence.

Calculation : Public sector Female pay expressed as percentage of male

Full time 2007 96 per cent    2008 95 per cent    2009 95 per cent

 

Marlyn Glen

To ask the Scottish Executive what the median hourly rates of pay were for (a) men in full-time employment, (b) women in full-time employment and (c) women in part-time employment in each of the last three years for which information is available.

Answered by John Swinney :

The preferred source for earnings estimates is the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), which is carried out by the Office for National Statistics.

The following table shows the median gross hourly pay excluding overtime for full-time and part-time employee jobs in Scotland by gender in 2007, 2008 and 2009. The median is the recommended measure of average earnings as opposed to the mean.

Median gross hourly pay excluding overtime for full-time and part-time employee jobs in Scotland by gender (£):


2007

2008

2009

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Full-time

11.59

10.21

12.04

10.74

12.39

11.33

Part-time

7.09

7.24

7.07

7.84

7.62

8.04

Source: Annual Survey for Hours and Earnings.

Notes:

1. The estimates are based on the pay excluding overtime for employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence.

Calculation : All sectors : Female full-time pay expressed as percentage of male full time pay

Full time    2007 88 per cent   2008 89 per cent      2009 92 per cent

Calculation : All sectors : Female part time pay expressed as percentage of male full time pay

Part time 2007 62 per cent   2008 65 per cent     2009 65 per cent

Employment

Marlyn Glen

To ask the Scottish Executive how many men were in (a) full-time and (b) part-time employment in the last year for which information is available.

Answered by John Swinney:

Annual estimates of full-time and part-time employment levels are available from the Annual Population Survey (APS) carried out by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). Updated APS data is published on a quarterly basis.

The following table shows the number of full-time and part-time employed men for Scotland from the latest available survey (July 2008 to June 2009), as well as data for the same period in the preceding year (July 2007 to June 2008).

Full-time and part-time Employed Workers, Men, Scotland (thousands), not Seasonally Adjusted


Full-time Workers

Part-time Workers

Jul 2007 to Jun 2008

1,204

136

Jul 2008 to Jun 2009

1,168

141

Source: Office for National Statistics.

2007-08 Ratio of men in full time employment to part-time employment 90 per cent to 10 per cent

2008-09 Ratio of men in full time employment to part-time employment 90 per cent to 10 per cent

 

Marlyn Glen

To ask the Scottish Executive how many women were in (a) full-time and (b) part-time employment in the last year for which information is available.

Answered by John Swinney :

Annual estimates of full-time and part-time employment levels are available from the Annual Population Survey (APS) carried out by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). Updated APS data is published on a quarterly basis.

The following table shows the number of full-time and part-time employed women for Scotland from the latest available survey (July 2008 to June 2009), as well as data for the same period in the preceding year (July 2007 to June 2008).

Full-time and Part-time Employed Workers, Women, Scotland (thousands), not Seasonally Adjusted


Full-time Workers Part-time Workers
Jul 2007 to Jun 2008 707 493
Jul 2008 to Jun 2009 704 491

Source: Office for National Statistics.

2007-08 Ratio of women in full time employment to part-time employment 60 per cent to 40 per cent

2008-09 Ratio of women in full time employment to part-time employment 59 per cent to 41 per cent

 

 

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